Tag Archives: cherries

Pick Your Own Food

Last winter I paid $10.00 for a bag of frozen blueberries. Because I did not get my kids and myself to the blueberry patch last summer, I had to pay ten dollars for berries! At the local patch where I usually pick, the blueberries are $1.10 per pound. A pound of blueberries is approximately a quart. I encourage everyone to get to your local growers this spring and summer to pick to your hearts content.

Try to harvest and preserve enough for one year. Blueberries are so easy to preserve. You pick the blueberries. You rinse the berries in cold water. You bag them in quart freezer bags and put them in the freezer.

In our area you can pick by yourself: blueberries, raspberries, strawberries, apples, cherries, and pumpkins. Explore what is available in your area and then bring in the harvest. Preserve the food and then give yourself a pat on the back for being prepared!!

Food picked fresh at a local grower whether you pick it yourself or they pick it for you is so much healthier for you. Picking food together as a family will draw your family closer together. Remind your children that we are doing this task together to be healthier, to save money, and to spend time together. Your kids may not appreciate it now, but someday they will. Proverbs 6:6-8 reads, “Go to the ant, you sluggard! Consider her ways and be wise, Which having no captain, Overseer or ruler, Provides her supplies in the summer, And gathers her food in the harvest.”

How to Plant a Bush

Whether more people are looking for organically grown food, or if a greater number of people are looking to grow their own food to be less dependent on the grocery store, there is a trend beginning. People are growing more of their own food! Growing and eating your own food is rewarding!

If you are growing your own food and you desire currants, red raspberries, black raspberries, blackberries, blueberries, or cherries, you are going to need to know how to plant a bush. All of these fruits grow on bushes or on canes.

First select a place to plant your bush where it will not get easily run over by being too close to the road or the driveway. Select a place with good drainage in your yard where water does not pond(puddles are not formed there after a rain) and where there is plenty of sunshine. Save the bones from any meat you eat for a week or two.

Next, dig a hole that you estimate will be big enough. After the hole is dug, go to the store and buy the bush you want. After you bring home the bush, lay it on top of a garbage bag or small tarp near the hole you dug. Remove the pot or packaging from the root ball. Now, carefully spread out the roots so that they are not tangled together and are all pointing in the opposite direction of the stem on the bush. Measure the roots. Measure the hole you dug. You want the hole you dug to be about eight inches deeper than the longest root of the bush. You want the hole to be two times as wide as the width of the roots. You may need to widen the hole you dug or make it deeper at this point.

Place in the bottom of the hole, the saved bones. It does not matter if the bones are cooked or raw. On top of the bones, place in the hole any leftover coffe grounds you have, a half inch layer on top of the bones is adequate. Do you have a compost pile? On top of the coffe grounds, shovel in about 8 inches worth of compost. You can buy compost if you do not have your own. Move the bush to the edge of the hole and allow the roots to fall into the hole, but keep the stem out of the hole. Fill the hole with cold water using buckets of water. You want to fill the hole quickly with water not let the water trickle in with a hose. Allow the water to drain from the hole.

Once the water has drained, either have someone hold the bush for you or support the bush with a stake. Make sure the bush is in the middle of the hole and the roots are untangled. Start shoveling the dirt in around the roots. For every three shovels of regular dirt, add a shovel full of compost if you have it. Continue filling in the dirt until the hole is filled. Water the bush again. Put a few stakes around it until people get accustomed to it being there. Water the bush at least once a week for about a month so that the bush does not get stressed and starts to grow. Depending on the maturity of the bush, you may enjoy your own fresh grown fruit this summer or in a few summers. Proverbs13:11 says, “Wealth gained by dishonesty will be diminished, but he who gathers by labor will increase.”(NKJV)

Bountiful Berries in July

Officially canning season begins on August 15, but there is much to harvest right now. Strawberries are finished unless they are everbearing, but the harvest continues.  Cherries, black raspberries, red raspberries are being harvested right now. Blackberries and blueberries are ripening as well.

When picking berries always use a hard container such as a bowl or plastic container. Summer is a great time to reuse and recycle. When you go berry picking use an clean, used yogurt container or cottage cheese container. Give the little ones one of these free containers and hold the bucket yourself. You can take a clean bucket and pour the smaller containers into the larger container until you have enough.

If a friend offers you free food for the picking, you should take advantage of their offer within 24 hours. Your friend is trying to preserve the bounty God has provided and share the blessing. If a person has a bounty of strawberries for instance and has a day when she cannot get out to the patch and pick, she calls you to pick. If you do not get there that same day, some of the berries will rot and be wasted. Did you know that?

If you go to a friend’s house to pick, you will be getting the freshest produce that you did not have to plant or weed around. You didn’t have to feed the plants or water them. At times pruning is involved to produce that food, and you did not have to do that. Please, if someone offers for you to come pick some food, drop everything and go. Try to process the food or eat it that day. Life is busy. If you pick berries and you do not have time to process them that day, you can wash them, put them in the freezer bags and ¬†into the freezer. If you lived elsewhere in the world, you would go because you would appreciate what a blessing free, usually organic, food is to you and your family. Americans tend to take food for granted, but not us we appreciate every blessing and delve into every good opportunity!

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